Geriatric Nutrition

Changes associated with normal aging increase nutritional risk for older adults. Nutrition has a major role in protecting health and slowing disease progression. Paradigms that promote the nutritional components of healthy aging are needed to increase the age of chronic degenerative disease onset and to maintain healthy, functional lives for as long as possible. At this time, there is a tremendous disconnecting between nutrition and how it is implemented into healthcare. While it is widely agreed upon that micronutrients play a large role in promoting health and preventing disease, meeting the nutritional needs of elderly persons, whether they are or are not living in institutionalized settings, is a great challenge. Micronutrient deficiencies are common in elderly people due to a number of factors such as reduced food intake, lack of variety in the foods they eat, medications that deplete nutrients and create side effects, the price of foods rich in micronutrients, and the deplorable food choices available in the institutional setting. Additionally, the elderly often suffers from anorexia of aging, because the hormones leptin and ghrelin increase as you age, leading to prolonged satiety and suppressed hunger, which can lead to calorie deficit and malnutrition. It is necessary to eat foods that are nutrient dense. People over the age of 60 have much less of the friendly bacteria in their gut, making them more susceptible to gastrointestinal infections and bowel conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome. Supplementing with products that contain healthy bacteria such as Lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidobacterium are helpful.

 

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    December 09-10, 2019

    International Conference on Geriatrics and Ageing

    Bangkok, Thailand

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